Should Employers Really Be Concerned With Whats On Facebook/Twitter Et Al? 2


Ever since the invention of social media sites such as Facebook at Twitter, there have been people out there who have been concerned that what they post will be found by their employer or perspective employer and either tarnish their chances of getting a job, or make them subject to disciplinary procedures.

Of course the material posted on such a site can vary dramatically from pictures of you being ‘merry’ after a night out with friends to doing things which are borderline illegal, and here I am of course talking about the first example. The truth is that no matter what work you are involved in, you are not a ‘robot’ and just like everyone else in this world, are entitled to let your hair down every now and again. Therefore if you put photographs of yourself enjoying yourself on a night out on Facebook or Twitter how on earth is that a problem? Furthermore if said employer or perspective employer sees these images, what does it prove, that you have a life outside of work? Hardly a surprise to anyone.

We also seem to forget that most bosses were also younger once as well, and that they to did things outside of work. However in todays tough economic climate I can’t help but think that people are trying to portray an image with their superiors which simply does not exist, one that they are innocent as the Archangel Gabriel. Whilst there is no harm in being committed to the job you are tasked to do, and I completely agree with those who get in trouble for bringing their employer into disrepute, it is damaging when you pretend to be something that you are not.

The way I see it there are two ways around this, as the chances are if you pretend to be something you are not, you are going to get found out eventually. The first his which you confine to being the thing you are telling everyone you are. You stay at home, knit items of clothes for children, and get into bed at 21:30 each night with a up of Horlicks and watch Newsnight. The second is that you bump up your privacy settings on Facebook to the max, make your twitter account private, and generally avoid having an opinion on anything online. However the problem with the latter is that if after searching for social media pages online with no luck, an employer or perspective employer will become suspicious, asking, what have you got to hide?

To be honest neither of these approaches are something which I would want to follow. So I have decided to use the third. I have accepted that I am human, and will have a life outside of work, and more importantly know I am entitled to enjoy it. Based on this reason, despite some concerns I will still continue to blog and tweet what I want within the confines of the law, and to be honest, see no reason why others should not do the same.

Provided what you get upto in your own time is in the confines of the law, and does not bring your employer into disrepute, you are entitled to a life outside work as much as the next person.

Provided what you get upto in your own time is in the confines of the law, and does not bring your employer into disrepute, you are entitled to a life outside work as much as the next person.

  • Lewis Taylor

    I couldn’t agree more, as long as I work hard – what difference does it make if I have a life outside work?!